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I don’t think it’s terribly controversial to note that women, from a young age, are required to consider the reality of the opposite gender’s consciousness in a way that men aren’t. This isn’t to say that women don’t often misunderstand, mistreat, and stereotype men, both in literature and in life. But on a basic level, functioning in society requires that women register that men are fully conscious; it is not really possible for a woman to throw up her hands and write men off as eternally unknowable space aliens — and even if she says she has, she cannot really behave as though she has. Every element of her life — from reading books about boys and men to writing papers about the motivations of male characters to being attentive to her own safety to navigating most any institutional or professional or economic sphere — demands an ironclad familiarity with, and belief in, the idea that men really are fully human entities. And no matter how many men come to the same conclusions about women, the structure of society simply does not demand so strenuously that they do so. If you didn’t really deep down believe that women were, in general, exactly as conscious as you, you could probably still get by in life. You could probably still get a book deal. You could probably still get elected to office.
Jennifer duBois, Writing Across Gender (via feimineach)

archiemcphee:

Let’s go to Idaho and have a slumber party inside this giant beagle! His name is ‘Sweet Willy’ and he’s a bed and breakfast located just outside the town of Cottonwood, Idaho. It’s called the Dog Bark Park Inn and it was built by Frances Conklin and Dennis Sullivan, who spent eighteen months building their awesome canine hotel. The inn offers two double bedroom and, as you’d hope, pet accommodations as well. They even leave a plate of dog-shaped cookies on your pillow.

So who’s coming with us? Visit the Dog Bark Park Inn website to book a reservation.

[via Lost At E Minor]

iamlucyspet:

thinksquad:

Since 1983, Larry Flynt has sent the monthly magazine he founded, Hustler, to each and every member of Congress.

The dirty mag comes in a plain manila envelope, fairly undetectable to the poor intern or staffer tasked with opening the mail. And every month, there it is: Hustler, featuring dozens of naked or scantly dressed women, vulgar comics, and articles, some satirical, on politics, society, and sex.

It’s not like members of Congress haven’t tried to stop the magazines from coming. They just can’t stop it legally.

Following the complaints from 264 congressional offices in 1984, the U.S. Postal Service asked the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia to block the mailings. But that request failed when the court ruled two years later that the delivery of the magazine could not be stopped. The court wrote:

Receiving Hustler once each month would not unduly burden a Member of Congress. Members are not forced to read the magazine or other of the mail they receive in volume. We cannot imagine that Congressional offices all lack wastebaskets.

For Hustler, it was a First Amendment issue. This was Flynt’s right to petition the government, he argued, and the court agreed. Or as Flynt told The Hill in 2011, “Moses freed the Jews, Lincoln freed the slaves, and I just wanted to free all the neurotics.”

Thirty years later, the congressional subscription count remains the same: 535. The magazine is not sent to members of the executive branch, though.

http://www.nationaljournal.com/congress/why-every-member-of-congress-gets-a-monthly-porn-delivery-20140417

i love larry flynt

There’s nothing “normal” about having a middle class. Having a middle class is a choice that a society has to make, and it’s a choice we need to make again in this generation, if we want to stop the destruction of the remnants of the last generation’s middle class. Despite what you might read in the Wall Street Journal or see on Fox News, capitalism is not an economic system that produces a middle class. In fact, if left to its own devices, capitalism tends towards vast levels of inequality and monopoly. The natural and most stable state of capitalism actually looks a lot like the Victorian England depicted in Charles Dickens’ novels.
The Middle Class Is Not ”Normal” (via azspot)
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